miércoles, 30 de mayo de 2012

Infant kids





¡QUÉ DIVERTIDO ES EL INGLÉS! 
ENGLISH IS GREAT FUN!

Tras todo un año de esfuerzos... se acerca el final de curso escolar y con este muchas metas alcanzadas. 
After a year riddled with efforts... the end of the school year is coming and many achieved goals, too.

lunes, 21 de mayo de 2012

THE OUR FATHER PRAYER


Our Father

The prayer which Jesus Christ taught to His disciples.

Traditional version:Our Father, Who art in heaven
Hallowed be Thy Name;
Thy kingdom come,
Thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us;
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil. Amen.



Newer version:
Our Father, Who is in heaven,
Holy is Your Name;
Your kingdom come,
Your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our sins,
as we forgive those who sin against us;
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil. Amen.



The Our Father is based on these passages from the Bible:

FAMILY

http://recursostic.educacion.es/primaria/hello/web/a/01/animaciones/index.html









This is an activity to practice the vocabulary of the family members:

http://www.juntadeandalucia.es/averroes/ceip_san_tesifon/recursos/ingles/act_interactivas/hot_potatoes/hp_3/hp_my_family_3_3/hp_my_family_3_3.html

SINGULAR AND PLURALS

Singular Noun Definition: When a noun means one only, it is said to be singular.Examples: boy, girl, book, church, box
Plural Noun Definition: When a noun means more than one, it is said to be plural.Examples: boys, girls, books, churches
Rule #1
The plural of nouns is usually formed by adding - s to a singular noun.
lamplamps
catcats
forkforks
flowerflowers
penpens
Exercise: Write the plural of each of these nouns

chairstarfarm
stormdoorrock
ownerpapercup


Rule #2
Nouns ending in 
szx, sh, and ch form the plural by adding - es.
mossmosses
buzzbuzzes
boxboxes
dishdishes
churchchurches

Rule #3
Nouns ending in - y preceded by a consonant is formed into a plural by changing - y to 
iesExamples: lady, ladies; city, cities; army, armiesRule #4
Nouns ending in y preceded by a vowel form their plurals by adding 
- s.
Example: boy, boys; day, days

Rule #5
Most nouns ending in o preceded by a consonant is formed into a plural by adding es. Example: hero; heroes; grotto, grottoes

Rule #6Some nouns ending in f or fe are made plural by changing f orfe to vesExample: beef, beeves; wife, wives



IRREGULAR PLURALS
man, menfoot, feetmouse, mice
woman, womentooth, teethlouse, lice
child, childrenox, oxengoose, gees


The following nouns have no singular:

scissors

oats

tongs

dregs
trouserspinchersbellowssnuffers
cattleshearsmeaslesmumps
victualstweezersvespers

Some nouns are always singular. Some of these nouns may be used in the plural when different kinds are meant as sugars, coffees, cottons
goldsilverwheatcorn
molassescoppersugarcotton

To do exercises and see more information:
http://www.englisch-hilfen.de/en/exercises_list/substantiv.htm

DAY & NIGHT

PREPOSITIONS








A preposition links nouns, pronouns and phrases to other words in a sentence. The word or phrase that the preposition introduces is called the object of the preposition.

A preposition usually indicates the temporal, spatial or logical relationship of its object to the rest of the sentence as in the following examples:

The book is on the table.
The book is beneath the table.
The book is leaning against the table.
The book is beside the table.
She held the book over the table.
She read the book during class.





THE WINNER OF THE "FAMILY TREE POSTER"



CONGRATULATIONS, JOHANNA Y CRISTIAN!





...AND THANKS FOR PARTICIPATING!




jueves, 10 de mayo de 2012

THE WINNER OF THE "LIFE CYCLE OF THE TREE" POSTER




CONGRATULATIONS, DAVID!


...AND THANKS TO THE REST OF THE CONTESTANTS!         (5TH PRIMARY PUPILS)









LIFE CYCLE OF A TREE


1. Fruit fall from the tree. Some of the seeds fall on the ground.
2. The roots grow from the seeds. 
3. The roots grow. Leaves grow.
4. The small tree grows. Branches grow.
5. The branches are longer now.  The tree is bigger now.
6. Every year the tree produces flowers.
7. Then, the tree produces fruit.

SIGNS
DON'T pick flowers!
DON'T drop litter!
DON'T light fires!

Close the gates!
Respect and protect the forest!

A SONG FROM PHINEAS AND FERB TO ENJOY YOURSELF







Everyone: Candace party! Candace party!
Candace: It's not a party, it's an intimate get together!
Everyone: Candace party! Candace party!
Candace: Don't call it that, it's just a get together!
Everyone: Candace party! Candace party!
Candace: Don't spill your drink
Don't drop your food
Don't make the music in the house go boom
Hey, don't use my mom's good scissors
And please stay out of my room
Take your feet off the chair
No running in the house
Put a coaster under that drink
Hey, these tchotchkes aren't for juggling
And that's a toilet, not a sink!

Candace: It's not a party, it's an intimate get together
Everyone: Candace party! Candace party!
Candace: Don't call it that, it's just a get together
Everyone: Candace party! Candace party!

Jeremy: Candace party!

Candace: Hey, what's this in this fishbowl?
I said don't play with the remote!
Hey close the door, were you born in a barn?
Which one of you brought this goat?

Candace: It's not a party, it's an intimate get together
Everyone: Candace party! Candace party!
Candace: Don't call it that, it's just a get together
Everyone: Candace party! Candace party!
Candace: We're talking I to the N to the T-I-M-A-T-E get together
Everyone: Whaaaat?
Candace: I to the N to the T-I-M-A-T-E get together
Everyone: That's right.

PRESENT SIMPLE & PRESENT CONTINUOUS




  • Structure differences

Present Simple:

- Maria plays tennis at the weekends
- She doesn’t study French.
- How many children do they have?
Remember:
- In positive we use two conjugations. One is the simple form and the other is the “s” form (play/plays)
- In negative sentences we use the auxiliaries don’t and doesn’t and the verb is ALWAYS in the simple form. (She doesn’t work)
- In the question form we use auxiliaries do and does and also the verb goes in the simple form. The subject goes in between the auxiliary and the verb. (Do you work here?)

Present continuous

- Maria is playing tennis.
- She isn’t studying.
- What are they doing?
Remember:
- When we construct the present continuous we use the verb to be. Therefore we DO NOT USE auxiliaries do, does, don’t or doesn’t.
- Use the “ing” form after the verb to be.
  • USES COMPARISON

Present SimplePresent Continuous
Routines / Habits : Maria smokesActions happening NOW: Maria is smoking
Permanent Actions: Pedro lives in SevillaTemporary actions: Juan is staying at the Marriot hotel.
Current facts/truths: I have two brothers

Exercises: 

Fill in the blanks with am/is/are/do/don’t/does/doesn’t
1. Excuse me _____ you speak English?
2. Have a cigarette. No, thank you. I _____ smoke.
3. Why ____ you laughing at me?
4. What ____ she do? She’s a dentist.
5. I ____ want to go out. It ____ raining.
6. Where ____ you come from? From Canada.
7. How much ____ it cost to send a letter to Canada?
8.I can’t talk to you at the moment. I ____ working.
9. George is a good tennis player but he _____ play very often.
Put the verb in present continuous or present simple
1. Excuse me, ______________ (you/speak) English?
2. Tom _________________ (have/shower) at the moment.
3. They _____________ (not/watch) television very often.
4. Listen! Somebody _______________ (sing)
5. She’s tired. She ____________ (want) to go home.
6. How often ____________________ (you/read) a newspaper?
7. Excuse me, but you __________________ (sit) in my place. Oh I’m sorry.
8. I’m sorry. I ___________________ (not/understand). Please speak more slowly.
9.Where are you Roy? I am in the office. I ___________________ (read)
10. What time __________________ (she/finish) work every day?
11. You can turn off the radio. I _____________________ (not listen) to it.
12. He ____________________ (not/usually/drive) to work. He usually ________ (walk)
More online activities

COMPARATIVE & SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES










The correct use of the comparative and superlative forms is a key ingredient when students are learning how to express their opinion or make comparative judgments. The previous lessons focuses on first building understanding of the structure - and of the similarity between the two forms.
We use the comparative and superlative form to compare and contrast different objects in English. Use the comparative form to show the difference between two objects. Example: New York is more exciting than Seattle. Use the superlative form when speaking about three or more objects to show which object is 'the most' of something. 
Example: New York is the most exciting city in the USA.

Forming Comparative and Superlative Adjectives:

One-syllable adjectives.
Form the comparative and superlative forms of a one-syllable adjective by adding –er for the comparative form and –est for the superlative.

One-Syllable Adjective Comparative Form Superlative Form
tall taller tallest
old older oldest
long longer longest

Mary is taller than Max. 
Mary is the tallest of all the students.
Max is older than John.
Of the three students, Max is the oldest.
My hair is longer than your hair.
Max's story is the longest story I've ever heard.

If the one-syllable adjective ends with an e, just add –r for the comparative form and –st for the superlative form.
One-Syllable Adjective with Final -e Comparative Form Superlative Form
large larger largest
wise wiser wisest

Mary's car is larger than Max's car.
Mary's house is the tallest of all the houses on the block.
Max is wiser than his brother.
Max is the wisest person I know.


If the one-syllable adjective ends with a single consonant with a vowel before it, double the consonant and add –er for the comparative form; and double the consonant and add –est for the superlative form.

One-Syllable Adjective Ending with a Single Consonant with a Single Vowel before It Comparative Form Superlative Form
big bigger biggest
thin thinner thinnest
fat fatter fattest

My dog is bigger than your dog.
My dog is the biggest of all the dogs in the neighborhood.
Max is thinner than John.
Of all the students in the class, Max is the thinnest.
My mother is fatter than your mother.
Mary is the fattest person I've ever seen.

Two-syllable adjectives.
With most two-syllable adjectives, you form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.

Two-Syllable Adjective Comparative Form Superlative Form
peaceful more peaceful most peaceful
pleasant more pleasant most pleasant
careful more careful most careful
thoughtful more thoughtful most thoughtful

This morning is more peaceful than yesterday morning.
Max's house in the mountains is the most peaceful in the world.
Max is more careful than Mike.
Of all the taxi drivers, Jack is the most careful.
Jill is more thoughtful than your sister.
Mary is the most thoughtful person I've ever met.

If the two-syllable adjectives ends with –y, change the y to i and add –er for the comparative form. For the superlative form change the y to i and add –est.
Two-Syllable Adjective Ending with -y Comparative Form Superlative Form
happy happier happiest
angry angrier angriest
busy busier busiest


John is happier today than he was yesterday.
John is the happiest boy in the world.
Max is angrier than Mary.
Of all of John's victims, Max is the angriest.
Mary is busier than Max.
Mary is the busiest person I've ever met.

Two-syllable adjectives ending in –er, -le, or –ow take –er and –est to form the comparative and superlative forms.
Two-Syllable Adjective Ending with -er, -le, or -ow 
Comparative Form Superlative Form
narrow narrower narrowest
gentle gentler gentlest


The roads in this town are narrower than the roads in the city.
This road is the narrowest of all the roads in California.
Big dogs are gentler than small dogs.
Of all the dogs in the world, English Mastiffs are the gentlest.
Adjectives with three or more syllables.


For adjectives with three syllables or more, you form the comparative with more and the superlative with most.
Adjective with Three or More Syllables Comparative Form Superlative Form
generous more generous most generous
important more important most important
intelligent more intelligent most intelligent


John is more generous than Jack.
John is the most generous of all the people I know.
Health is more important than money.
Of all the people I know, Max is the most important.
Women are more intelligent than men.
Mary is the most intelligent person I've ever met.

Exceptions.
Irregular adjectives.
Irregular Adjective Comparative Form Superlative Form
good better best
bad worse worst
far farther farthest
little less least
many more most


Italian food is better than American food.
My dog is the best dog in the world.
My mother's cooking is worse than your mother's cooking.
Of all the students in the class, Max is the worst.

Two-syllable adjectives that follow two rules. These adjectives can be used with -er and -est and with more and most.
Two-Syllable Adjective Comparative Form Superlative Form
clever cleverer cleverest
clever more clever most clever
gentle gentler gentlest
gentle more gentle most gentle
friendly friendlier friendliest
friendly more friendly most friendly
quiet quieter quietest
quiet more quiet most quiet
simple simpler simplest
simple more simple most simple


Big dogs are gentler than small dogs.
Of all the dogs in the world, English Mastiffs are the gentlest.
Big dogs are more gentle than small dogs.
Of all the dogs in the world, English Mastiffs are the most gentle.

sábado, 5 de mayo de 2012

MY ENGLISH PUPILS FROM BRISTOL SINGING "QUARTERMASTER'S STORE"


 Lyrics: There are rats, rats, as big as alley cats,
At the store, at the store. There are rats, rats, as big as alley cats, At the Quartermaster's store. 

Chorus: My eyes are dim, I can not see. I have not brought my specks with me. [Repeat]

Mice . . . running through the rice.
Snakes . . . as big as garden rakes.
Beans . . . as big as submarines.
Gravy . . . enough to float the navy.
Cakes . . . that give us tummy aches.
Eggs . . . with scaly chicken legs.
Butter . . . running in the gutter.
Bread . . . with great big lumps like lead.
Cheese . . . that makes you want to sneeze.
Goats . . . eating all the oats
Bees . . . with little knobby knees.

LET'S DO AN ACTIVITY ABOUT THE BODY!

BODY PARTS VOCABULARY

Ms. Vicky's Voki

LET'S LEARN ABOUT PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION!

WHAT ARE THEY LIKE? physical description by Carlos Reis. Find this and other describing people exercises in English Exercises .org

PHYSICAL DESCRIPTION SAMPLES